the-button-859349 960 720      Support 175x60

IAM May 2010

Article Index

{googleAds}<script type="text/javascript"><!--
google_ad_client = "pub-1639146662835785";
/* 300x250, In Content */
google_ad_slot = "1440441209";
google_ad_width = 300;
google_ad_height = 250;
//-->
</script>
<script type="text/javascript"
src="http://pagead2.googlesyndication.com/pagead/show_ads.js">
</script>{/googleAds}

In July 2008, during a Group email discussion of copper Paleo-like points Don wrote: “Jack Steinbring recognized and named this type of copper projectile point as the McCreary. Steinbring (1968) characterized the McCreary Points as, “…utilizing a technology and material of the Great Lakes Archaic, and a style reminiscent of the Paleo- Indian lithic styles may have fused at many points with aggressive manifestations of Boreal Archaic reflected in copper.”

Don goes on to write; “The original McCreary was found by Donald Kreiser (1966) near McCreary, Western Manitoba. Other McCreary Points were found in Wisconsin and Michigan. Because of the point’s similarity in characteristics to the lithic Agate Basin (8500-7400 B.C.) and because lithic Agate Basins were found in the same general area, Steinbring described the McCreary as: “a possible generalized flint Agate Basin, hammered from native copper.”

There is still much ongoing discussion as to whether or not Agate Basin lithic points are Late Paleo, Plano, Transitional Paleo or Early Archaic. The future will resolve the issue.

In January of 2008 I happened to mention to an associate, Dan Wendt, a ‘spare-time’ avocational archaeologist from Minnesota, about my research on Paleo-like copper points to which he responded with a couple of photos of McCreary-like copper points curated by the Minnesota Historical Society. These points are in the Rev. Edward Mitchell collection, which he had acquired from T.H. Lewis. Upon application, the MHS granted me permission to use these in this article (Photo #4). The point at left was found around Lake Pepin, in Pepin County, Wisconsin, while the other point was recovered in Washington County, Wisconsin. Both are over 5” long.photo4

Doctor Spohn has also acquired, and curates, 2 Agate Basinlike (McCreary) copper points at The GLCR Group (Photo #5). In photo #5 the longer point, recovered in Wisconsin, is 5-1/4” long, while the shorter one is 3-3/4” long (no provenance).

{googleAds}<script type="text/javascript"><!--
google_ad_client = "pub-1639146662835785";
/* In-Content_468x60 */
google_ad_slot = "0999140173";
google_ad_width = 468;
google_ad_height = 60;
//-->
</script>
<script type="text/javascript"
src="http://pagead2.googlesyndication.com/pagead/show_ads.js">
</script>{/googleAds}

Next we have a slightly different style of copper point (5-1/2” long), reflective of the lithic Hell Gap points, considered to be from the period 12,000 to 9,000ybp from the Mid- West, and described as: “contracting stem…the widest part of the blade is above mid-section” (Overstreet 2nd edition, INDIAN ARROWHEADS), which is reflected in this point (Photo #6). Lithic Hell Gap points are often found in association, and concurrent with lithic Agate Basin points (11,500 to 10,000ybp).

This copper point, like the McCreary, was also found on the western shore of Ancient Lake Agassiz, near Grand Forks, ND, which is only about 360 kilometers SSE of McCreary, Manitoba, home of the named McCreary point. It was acquired by Gregg, a member of our Discussion Group, in April 2008. I suggest that this point, and others like it be named the Agassiz point, reflective of its recovery location.

Steve, another Group Member, in Wisconsin Rapids, sent me a couple of photos.The first is another McCreary type copper point recovered by Rich, a friend of his (Photo #7, two views). Rich tells me that this point is 5-7/8” long, 1-3/16” wide, and 1/8” thick, no median ridges, and weighs two ounces. He recovered it on private property (with permission), in Vilas County, WI, about 100 feet from, and 10 feet above, the river.

The second photo that Steve arranged for me to receive, is a pair of points, a large lithic point along with a copper point, with similar attributes, that Steve’s friend Gary Weimer, of Wauwatosa, WI recovered in Winnebago County, WI, a year apart in an area within 2 miles of each other (Photo #8).

{googleAds}<script type="text/javascript"><!--
google_ad_client = "pub-1639146662835785";
/* 300x250, In Content */
google_ad_slot = "1440441209";
google_ad_width = 300;
google_ad_height = 250;
//-->
</script>
<script type="text/javascript"
src="http://pagead2.googlesyndication.com/pagead/show_ads.js">
</script>{/googleAds}

Gary tells me than an archaeologist advised him that this style is named the Dalton, and has been found around the Lake Winnebago region. It may be appropriate to name the 3-3/4” copper point theWinnebago point, also reflective of its area of use and recovery.

Noel D. Justice, Stone Age Spear and Arrow Points of the Midcontinental and Eastern United States, in a Distribution Map on page 35, shows the Beaver Lake type of the Dalton Cluster as having been recovered as far north as the extreme SW corner ofWisconsin and a very small corner of SE Minnesota, neither area close to LakeWinnebago. Both of Gary’s points suggest more of a Dalton Classic look, which according to Justice (1987) does NOT appear that far north. He shows on page 41, the Dalton Classic as being a southeastern point reaching only as far north as mid-Iowa and Illinois. Justice notes the age and Cultural Affiliation as being around the Transitional Period between Paleo and Archaic, suggesting 10,500 to 9,900ybp. You be the judge.

In my first article I showed you a photo of a frame of lanceolate points from the Hamilton Collection, curated by the University of Wisconsin (Madison). I’ve extracted photos of four of the 24 points from that collection to show you. You will note that there are slight differences in the profiles of each of these points, although each is a McCreary-like copper point (Photo #9).